iWheel4Fun: Singapore’s Largest Personal Mobility Carnival

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Bid for Singapore Book of Records - Largest Gathering of Personal Mobility Devices

Largest Gathering of Local Personal Mobility Distributors Under One Roof

iWheel4Fun is bringing back Singapore’s largest active mobility carnival with the second edition held at Tanah Merah Ferry Terminal, on Saturday, 9th September 2017. iWheel4Fun will also be making a bid for the Singapore Book of Records for the largest gathering of Personal Mobility Devices (PMDs) at the event. Having successfully garnered over 1000 participants last year, they are expecting a larger turnout, with over 3,000 PMD enthusiasts on board this year.

iWheel4Fun is a community initiative by SCC Travel Services, a subsidiary of Singapore Cruise Centre. This year, iWheel4Fun has established itself as Singapore’s premier PMD advocacy community, partnering with the URA and other government initiatives such as LTA’s Safe Riding Programme, MSF’s Families for Life and Sport SG’s GetActive! Singapore. As a hub connecting various retailers, community groups, government agencies and non-profit organisations, iWheel4Fun is fueling the nation’s collective shift towards a car-lite society with active mobility as a key cog.

Additionally, as a testament to iWheel4Fun as Singapore’s largest PMD carnival, the event will showcase the biggest gathering of PMD distributors and retailers under one roof, allowing PMD enthusiasts to enjoy the latest PMDs available in the market.

Powering Safe Riding Initiatives and a Gracious Community

With an estimated 30,000 PMD riders on our local streets, there has also been an increase in public concern toward PMD safety.  As part of efforts to instil PMD riders with safe riding habits at the event, there will be safety workshops designed to guide users on the correct use of devices, as well as safety courses for children and teenagers.

Mr Denis Koh, chairman of e-scooter enthusiast community, Big Wheel Scooters Singapore, who also sits on the LTA’s Active Mobility Advisory Panel, added, "With PMDs only recently rising in prominence in our public areas, there will be teething problems in assimilating PMDs into every Singaporean’s way of life. Embracing the sharing of public paths between the general public and PMD users will take some time to happen. Once we accept that it is here to stay, things will fall into place in time."

Challenging Obstacle Circuits for The Entire Family

At this year’s iWheel4Fun carnival, there will be an obstacle challenge with two competition categories, namely electric scooters and unicycles, for veteran PMD riders to pit their skills against each other. There will also be a fun circuit for children between 2 to 5 years old to test their skills on no-pedal balance bikes. Additionally, parent-child teams can navigate through a family friendly e-scooter obstacle course to inculcate safe riding practices. The wide variety of activities means that no member of the family is left behind, ensuring that beyond being a PMD enthusiast event, it can be a great day out for the entire family!

Setting the Singapore Book of Records for Largest Gathering of PMDs

Top of it all off, after a fun-filled day of activities, iWheel4Fun will congregate all PMD users, owners and enthusiasts for the Singapore Book of Records attempt at the largest gathering of PMDs in one location. This attempt also acts as the perfect way to celebrate the recent growth of PMD usage in Singapore and its growing significance to a car-lite society in the days to come.

Ms Annie Chia, events manager at SCC Travel Services, talked about iWheel4Fun’s role in Singapore’s burgeoning PMD community. “iWheel4Fun was set up with the purpose of promoting the use of PMDs among new users as well as strengthening the existing PMD community through various initiatives. With events like the bid for Singapore Book of Records, we aim to connect the PMD communities, industry partners as well as governmental and non-governmental organisations to continuously advocate for fun, social and safe PMD usage in Singapore.”